portrait Lil’ Ben redo prog #7

more details…progress child portrait

This is a gradual process adding lights and adding darks detail after detail…. Back and forth. I am feeling like I finally have succeeded in creating an image that is the person in front of a reflection. Now to just finish up all the details.

 

 

portrait Lil’ Ben redo prog #3

more progress…

closeup of face
skin tones

A closeup view. Adding skin tones and hair tones along with some of that sweater shading. The yellow that you see is the mastik or resist that is reserving the white areas for me to be able to work with better later on when I do the details.

 

inspirational snapshot

I have not been able to attend these meetings in a while and will be going to one tomorrow night at the Spokane Watercolor Society on Wednesday and I am working on the assigned challenge of “reflection” to take with me. I was taken at our family Christmas cruise on Lake Coeur d’Alene, (our son-in-law arranged) to go see Santa which was fabulous. This photograph was taken by my “co-conspirator Grandma” Sandi Shirley of my youngest grandson (Benjamin) and his cousin and I am going to finish painting Ben and cousin reflection it for that meeting.

Second book for Australian Author

Julie Anne Ford has just published a second young children’s book entitled “Jack & His New Tool Kit”. It is a cute short story about an inventive little boy that gets a new tool kit and is off on adventures with it.

I used a bright and free kind of style with watercolor pencils and then finished up with regular “brush” watercolors. The main character is pursuing new ideas with his tools, he was a lot of fun. You can see a copy on Amazon at this link;

Jack & His New Tool Kit

If you like it please remember to leave her a good review.

Illustrations for an Australian Author

Julie Anne Ford has just published a young children’s book entitled “GABBY Loves to Talk”. It is a cute short story about a girl that talks and talks and talks….

I used a bright and free kind of style with watercolor pencils and then finished up with regular “brush” watercolors. The main character has red hair and lots to say, and she was a lot of fun to draw. You can see a copy on Amazon at this link;

Gabby Likes to Talk by Julie Anne Ford

If you like it please remember to leave her a good review.

Steps for Watercolor Illustration

 

Continued…  painting images for children’s books?

Steps Involved…

These examples of the steps are from a new book I am currently working on making watercolors for “preschool age” children.  It is written by a talented Australian author named Julie Anne Ford. I will let you know when it is up and ready to see on Amazon.com
entitled, 

HAS ANYONE WARNED YOU I LIKE TO TALK?

Amelia is the darling 5-year-old main character

my previous post covered the sketch approval steps 1 & 2.
PAINTING
3. -resist

initial masking and background setup for watercolors
little girl with fantasy background laying in of background washes.

I usually use resist to hold out the areas I want to keep white.  It is sometimes called liquid frisket or resist and it sure makes the painting easier and faster. You can see the masking material on the surface of this painting, it is shiny yellow.
4. -washes/backgrounds

layout of a little girl in a fantasy background
painting backgrounds in a watercolor painting

I begin by laying in the washes and backgrounds. The bright colors filling up the big areas really quickly begins to bring the ideas-to-life.
5. -main subjects

fantasy creatures behind a little girl talking at the dinner table
painting objects and subjects for 3D shading and form

Now it is time to add form and details to main subjects and get that 3D shading thing happening.
6. -remove resist/frisket

fantasy creatures behind a little girl talking at the dinner table
remove frisket

7. -details

I will not be able to share this finished image with you on the blog, as it would cause problems with the author’s copyright. But the book will be available soon on Amazon.com. Feel free to contact me if you need any assistance locating it.

Steps for Drawing Roughs

 

How do I go about illustrating images for children’s books?

These examples of the steps are from a new book I am currently working on making watercolors for “preschool age” children.  It is written by a talented Australian author named Julie Anne Ford. I will let you know when it is up and ready to see on Amazon.com
entitled, 

HAS ANYONE WARNED YOU I LIKE TO TALK?

Amelia is the darling 5-year-old main character

SKETCHES

1. Rough sketches
rough sketch

These are the quick ideas I put down as I read through the text, sometimes the author will request changes at this stage.
2. Final sketches

rough pencil sketch little girl and fantasy scene behind her
rough sketch

this step is usually where changes are requested…

little girl with collage of ideas behind her
final sketch

next is the painting…