Basting… carseat

The plan is to attach this pad to the upholstery with quilting seams. I get to work, cutting the pad into the basic shapes in my sewing room.

By the way, cutting a furniture pad with scissors makes a guaranteed blister on you hand, thereby increasing the joy with which you approach the rest of the project. NOT!

I cut the pad to fit the surface that you sit on going to the edge of the seat on the bottom. Then as it goes up the back of the seat, I follow the surfaces going up and over (under the head rests) carefully marking where the knobby things are and the corners.

Next, I get to work hand basting the upholstery on top of the padding so I can later roll it to allow sewing the quilt lines on the sewing machine. This is where I discover that needles do not like to penetrate a thick pad and upholstery material. I even have to grab one of my Grandma’s thimbles to save my fingertips after a while.

Searching… carseat sewing cont’d

Searching everywhere!

Closets, shelves, heating room, garage and shop. Wa La! I find a packing pad, the kind you wrap refrigerators in to move. Perfect for the padding underneath. Pulling it out of it’s hiding space I get a whif! Peeee Youuuuu! Badly in need of a bath, so another delay as it is put in the wash, and dried multiple times.

Tick Tock, Tick Tock,Tick Tock.

The packing pad is what I use to lay on the seat and measure the sizes, shapes and surfaces by marking it with my good ole sharpie pen. Who cares, about the marks, they won’t show after the upholstery material is put on top.

Measuring

The Project begins. I get into the back seat and start to measure with my trusty measuring tape.

Wow! There are sure a lot of curves and thing-a-ma-jigs involved with a Subaru back seat. Hmmmmm.

Two seats divided in the middle with various seat belts on the seat parts with bendable and moveable requirements. Curves everywhere and don’t forget those little knobby things that you have to push down to pull the seat forward or the head rests.

How on earth do you hold it down on the seat? Velcro, elastic, string? Oh my goodness. As I pulled fabric over the seat I realized it was probably too light to absorb that drink that my youngest grandson will probably spill on his first outing.

So, everything screeches to an abrupt halt as I immediately go on a search for absorbent padding to use underneath.

Mystery Sewing Project Story

I already shared that this great sewing project idea was hatched in a fabric store by a beautiful tropical print upholstery material for sale on the clearance rack.

OK… a car seat cover for the back seat of my kinda “new to me” Subaru Outback.

It has a dark interior and is in good shape so before I put paintings and dogs and kids in it I thought I’d sew up a cover to protect it. When I saw the material, it reminded me so much of home that I loved it, as Kahaluu (my home town) has been calling my name lately. I have never sewn upholstery, except for the red caterpillar seat, which was a novel story in itself. Sewing vinyl or leather with a regular sewing machine is tough. But still do-able! For sure! I thought this upholstery material was so much lighter that it would be easy.

After all, what is so hard about measuring and sewing a seat cover, or three? Ha ha. Well… life with an artist…

Hummingbird Tablecloth progressing w/ flora…

There are now nineteen completed hummingbirds embroidered around the edge of this 96″ x 55″ white tablecloth.

I began showing this embroidery project earlier this year, showing each hummingbird as it was being completed, the total tablecloth is progressing nicely to the next level. I began with drawing sketches of what I want to do on the cloth with an iron-off marker, (bought in the quilt section of the fabric store) then just get out my box full of thread (floss) and go for it. It is relaxing like painting with colorful thread for me. TV is often boring – especially the commercials so I enjoy doing this embroidery in the evenings to relax.

When completed my tablecloths don’t sit in a chest not being used. I give them to family, and really love to use them myself for fancy dinners or celebrations, and, I do sell some. I have even been known to take them to church auctions to raise money and do my tithing.

Progressing…

With the 19 birds around the edges complete, I am now adding branches with vines wrapped around them with occasional honeysuckly blossoms mixed-in and it seems to be really coming to life. Here is the first completed corner.

Hummingbird #14

This diving acrobat is aiming for his target blossom with one extended wing and one in gliding slimline. I had a bit of fun using bright purple for his shadow areas and give him a roundness with light blue on the top surface. The forest gree wing surfaces allows enough seperation to really show the wings as separate from his body.