Horse theme on a bike

horseHonda 250 Rebel

This is the second motorcycle I painted with an airbrush and it won a spot for “Great Paint” in a motorcycle publication named Full Throttle magazine, which surprised me and inspired me to keep on doing airbrush. I used to get people checking it our anytime I parked it in a parking lot. It was  a little Honda Rebel 250, a classic that my husband Pete painted a royal blue for me. I went to work painting images from pictures and memories of my horse I had while growing up. His name was Rocky, and  was a quite spirited gelding who just loved to run. I have many wonderful memories of riding the paths in the mountains of Kahaluu with him. Rocky really was fast and he did win the state finals reserve championship for pole-bending.

motorcycle horse airbrush

This is an horse theme airbrush design on a motorcycle using a style I call “Ghosted or Shadow” airbrush. It is accomplished using metallic acrylics on a dark background and the curved surface really gives it a kick when viewed in sunlight. These pictures were taken before the clear coat was applied.

The style has a intriguing effect because it is subtle enough to need close observance to enjoy. Kind of a discovered mystery image.

shadow horse 1 design for tank shadow horse 2 shadow horse 3 shadow horse 4 shadow horse 5 shadow horse 6

a horse illustration…

This one was a mixed media done as a practice session or equine study. It is available in the studio.

Horses in different positions and styles done before doing a motorcycle gas tank design in “Shadow” style, later that week.

Horse Ink Shadows G3306

Horse Ink Shadows G3306
20″w x 30″h ink/acrylic airbrush on illustration board

Third missing painting

Koolau’s Haiku K504”,

view from mountain top path way in Hawaii
Koolaus Haiku K504

is a painting done from the memory of a strenuous hike I did in high school with my cousins up to the top of the Koolau mountain range at the back of Haiku valley on Oahu. I believe it is now called the “Stairway to Heaven” hike and is not open because a large storm damaged sections of it recently. You can find information about it easily by searching, “Stairway to Heaven, Hawaii”.

This hike is straight up “literally” most of the way and is not a hike for weenies. It takes stamina and half a day to climb all the metal stairs that were installed by the military leading up to the top where there was a “naval communication cable” antennae stretched from one bunker to another bunker across the valley on the opposing ridge line. Take food, water and bedding but sure to keep that pack light cause these steps do seem to be never ending by the time you reach the top.  We were allowed to camp at the concrete bunker on the ridge leading up to the top of the mountain trail.

The next morning just a few minutes before sunrise I woke up stiff but eager to take the short walk up the path on the ridge to the very top of the Koolaus. The top isn’t very far from the bunker (under 5 minutes). In ancient times, the runners traveled on this path stretching from the north to south of the island carrying messages between neighboring villages and the royalty. When you reach it you find that this famous route is surprisingly only a couple feet wide with one heck of a drop off on each side. There are strong winds all the time and earth shattering views of both sides of the island from this ancient pathway. I sat there and absorbed the history as I witnessed the most beautiful sunrise and panoramic view of the island I ever seen. It had moving rainbows appearing and disappearing randomly, a sight I will never ever forget.

Second missing painting

Seven Horse Spirits K404”,

A collection of seven horse images in a collage.
Seven Horse Spirits K404

is a celebration of painting the spirit of the horse using a collage of all ages, hues, and personalities. It was simply inspired from my ongoing love of the equine since early childhood. My first job was in the summer working for “Tugman’s Stable” which was within walking distance from where we lived in Kahaluu, Oahu, Hawaii. The duties included feeding, cleaning stalls and riding beautiful ex-race horses in the surrounding mountain paths every day. A job I really loved.

Do you know where this painting is?

 

First missing painting

Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304”,

little boy with ice cream headache while at the state fair
Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304

is a portrait inspired by a memory of a cute little boy that I saw getting an “ice cream headache” in front of the rides at the state fair just over the border in Oregon. I noticed him during my walk out to the RV after closing my own “facepainting” booth for the night. I did face painting at five state fairs every year for awhile, just another venue of art explored by this artist.

facepainting

 

tracing whereabouts of lost art

In October 2007 these paintings were donated to  “Holy Family Hospital” and placed in their Shamrock Gala auction, Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304”, “Seven Horse Spirits K404”, and “Koolau’s Haiku K504”.

The mystery of where the 3 missing paintings ended up afterwards begins after they are placed in Holy Family Hospital’s initial “Shamrock Gala” fundraiser auction. The event was held at the Davenport Hotel in Spokane WA in March of 2008. A beautiful affair that I was graciously given a ticket to attend. Tuxedos and formal dinner attire were required to a sit down meal with table center pieces that had tree branches painted gold, foliage and tubular lights intertwined.  I have a souvenir wine glass from the event pictured below,  “Latah Creek” and “Shamrock Gala” on it. Here is a link to more information about the event that was rec’d later.

Shamrock Gala wineglass Shamrock Gala, Latah Creek wineglass

Two paintings, Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304 and Seven Horse Spirits K404 were not sold at the auction and I don’t know what became of them. Contacting the hospital to request  information about their outcomes has not been successful in locating them so far.

One of the paintings did find a home, Koolau’s Haiku K504was purchased during the course of this auction by a sweet couple who I was able to meet afterwards. I  recall that they live somewhere here is Spokane WA but I regret that I never did think to get their names or contact information when I was introduced to them.

I would like to be able to locate these missing children (lost oil paintings) from the beginning time period of my oil rub-outs career so I can complete the information for my records. I wouldn’t mind seeing them again also. Please feel free to contact me with any suggestions you may have to help locate them.

3 paintings donated to charity are lost

In October 2007 these paintings were donated to  “Holy Family Hospital”, Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304”, “Seven Horse Spirits K404”, and “Koolau’s Haiku K504”.

Where are they now? I don’t know. Do You?

I would like to be able to locate these three lost oil rub-out-oils. Not knowing where they are almost feels like a missing child to an artist. Please feel free to contact me with any suggestions you may have to help locate them.

Size does matter

BTW. Four foot wide just doesn’t fit inside small vehicles for transport. These large guys had to travel on top of my Subaru, wrapped in tarps and tied down for the trip. This is where I learned that, “Size really does matter!”

These beginning large “rub-out oil” paintings had been admired by many who attended the art shows I was in

Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304”, “Seven Horse Spirits K404”, and “Koolau’s Haiku K504”.

There were often returning prospective collectors obviously in the throes of decision making, some even following me from one show to the next measuring and discussing transportation possibilities. This was followed by phone calls and emails. But the interest did not result in sales and as time went on it became apparent that there was going to be an insurmountable difficulty in finding anyone with a large enough home or business space to hang these 4ft x 4ft paintings.

Back at the studio, things became more and more cramped in my studio as my husband and I continued to build a new home and after work and on weekends. Every time I returned from a show I found myself repairing these large paintings because they were getting scratched and dinged during transport.

I had to decide to donate the 3 largest oil paintings to charity because they were too difficult for me to move around show-to-show and find enough storage space for them in-between the shows.

Rub-Out Oil beginnings

After the Louis Maestas seminar weekend in 2004, I felt totally inspired and no longer afraid of using oil paints in my studio. Lou had told me that he could see that I already had what it takes, and I should use my talents now. He suggested some next steps to take and advised that I  “just start doing large oils”. My husband was inspired too by meeting him and seeing his beautiful work, so he went into action building self framing large board canvases to paint on. I textured the first canvas’ right away and began painting from the heart.

There was a total of 4 really large ones that I did immediately after the weekend spent learning with Louis Maestas.  One of these large northwest landscape oils was entitled, “Horseshoe Lake Boat Reflections L604“. It was sold to a local collector so my records are complete and I know it’s present day location.

Lakeside boats casting reflections on the water in a northwest shoreline.
Sixth rub-out oil painting done.

My small studio became very busy and full of drying oils as I went on the road applying at and touring art galleries, and setting up my art at events.