Cape Disappointment Lighthouse #11

The lighthouse and the other exterior buildings at the top of the cliff are rendered using grays and black for shadow and shape. The final adjustments throughout the rest of the painting are completed using red tones in the cliff side, and darker tones along each wave crest and the shoreline. All small touches that are so important to give that final zing of movement and shape.

Cape Disap 11

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse #6-7

It is time to remove the mastic so I can get down to the details in painting this view. I start on the left side of the image, see the crisp whites appear where the yellow once was.

Cape Disap 06

Proceed to the right side till all of the mastic is removed. Not all areas that I am removing the watercolor resist from were totally white. It is especially noticeable in the cliff where some of the original light wash shows through.

Cape Disap 07

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse #5

The trees and shrubbery are next. I begin by drawing trees with a thin wash of light gray to show the furthest fading into the distance. Then I add greens and browns in various amounts to brighten the trees and shrubs as they come closer. Closer is brighter. If it is where the light is shining it becomes even brighter.

Cape Disap 04

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse #4

The cliffs are highlighted first with one of my favorite colors, Quinacridone Gold by Daniel Smith. I am replacing the colors I run out of with this brand whenever possible because the colors are so vibrant. To darken the Cliffside in the areas that are recessed along the shore I use an earth tone created by mixing greens and reds. This color combo creates the best blacks… a great array of darkness.

The same blues used in the sky are then added to the ocean swells along with greens and purples to mark the darkest areas in the waves. Water always seems to reflect the sky so well.Cape Disap 04

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse #1

I began with a sketch made from my own photograph of the area because I liked the wave layout better. It seemed much more sunny and welcoming of a pattern of currents.

Cape Disapp 01

I quickly realized that I would not be able to preserve all the little areas of white without using some mastic (watercolor resist) to reserve the many areas of white and foam in the surf. So I let the surface fully dry and applied this resist before I was able to proceed.

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse Commission

Seaside Lighthouse Commission

My client wanted a watercolor done of the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse for their parents at Christmas. Here are some of the steps taken to create this painting

I received an example showing what they were thinking of but they wanted a warmer looking day maybe with some sun.

rec'd from client
I found a sunnier shot of the same area that had a great array of sunny color.

sunnier shot

I also took a look through my own photographs to find a shot taken of that same bay while we were on vacation on the coast of Oregon. This just so happened to be a beautiful sunny day when my husband and I hiked up to the lighthouse a few years ago with a couple of friends.

my own photograph

boat on water

This week working with, Stan Miller for advanced watercolor class at Spokane Art Supply… we were challenged to take a picture of a boat and apply some artistic design to improve the layout composition along with achieving some good realism in the rendering. I enjoyed the mission 🙂

water being a mirror
water being a mirror

This is for sale unframed $20. I just love the way water can become a mirror showing the underside of boats and piers and beautiful sunset skys, it makes me think of warm ocean waters and early morning at Kaneohe Bay, rowing out to Jon Olson’s boat.

tracing whereabouts of lost art

In October 2007 these paintings were donated to  “Holy Family Hospital” and placed in their Shamrock Gala auction, Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304”, “Seven Horse Spirits K404”, and “Koolau’s Haiku K504”.

The mystery of where the 3 missing paintings ended up afterwards begins after they are placed in Holy Family Hospital’s initial “Shamrock Gala” fundraiser auction. The event was held at the Davenport Hotel in Spokane WA in March of 2008. A beautiful affair that I was graciously given a ticket to attend. Tuxedos and formal dinner attire were required to a sit down meal with table center pieces that had tree branches painted gold, foliage and tubular lights intertwined.  I have a souvenir wine glass from the event pictured below,  “Latah Creek” and “Shamrock Gala” on it. Here is a link to more information about the event that was rec’d later.

Shamrock Gala wineglass Shamrock Gala, Latah Creek wineglass

Two paintings, Don’t Rush a Good Thing I304 and Seven Horse Spirits K404 were not sold at the auction and I don’t know what became of them. Contacting the hospital to request  information about their outcomes has not been successful in locating them so far.

One of the paintings did find a home, Koolau’s Haiku K504was purchased during the course of this auction by a sweet couple who I was able to meet afterwards. I  recall that they live somewhere here is Spokane WA but I regret that I never did think to get their names or contact information when I was introduced to them.

I would like to be able to locate these missing children (lost oil paintings) from the beginning time period of my oil rub-outs career so I can complete the information for my records. I wouldn’t mind seeing them again also. Please feel free to contact me with any suggestions you may have to help locate them.